Augusta District

 

Augusta District Newsletter, 1-4-17

Note:  Deadlines are BOLDED

1.  Move/Stay forms from SPR committees and pastors are needed by Jan 12th at the district office.

2.  Deadline to register for the District Clergy Retreat is Jan. 23rd.

RSVP online registration;

http://thequestonline.com/event/leadership-conference-leonard-sweet/

Time – Jan. 30th, 9am to 5pm

Place – Quest UMC

Cost - $10 (to cover lunch – scholarships are available in needed; contact the DS)

Credit - .5 CEUs

The event is open to clergy and laity

It is expected that all full time appointment clergy will take part.  If you are unable to participate, please contact the DS to explain why.

Speaker – Leonard Sweet

Theme – “Coming Apart”

Read the Gospel of Mark before attending.  In many ways the gospel is organized according to the “advances” Jesus took. Count the number of times Mark says, “and Jesus came apart.”

Now look deeper into the places where Jesus “came apart”: the mountains, the desert, and the water. Three different sacred spaces, holy landscapes. These three natural places have the power to help restore us to physical, mental and spiritual harmony. Your soul needs all three, and you need to discern the state of your soul to decide which is most vital at this time.

3.  From our District Statistician, Hugh Hendrickson:

·        I am new to the role of District Statistician.  I inherited the mantel from Dave Hinson.  Being new to this task means I might not know all the answers to your question, but I will do my best to find the answer. So please bear with me as I learn the ropes.

·        Reports are due January 31, 2017.  Due means entered into the Ezra reporting program, submitted, and reviewed by January 31, 2017.

·        You can begin filling out your End of Year Reports on January 3, 2017.

·        To log into the Ezra visit Data Services at https://data.ngumc.org.

·        Your username is your ngumc.net email address.  If have issues with your password, click on the blue password assistance button.  The District Office and I are unable to help with password recovery.

·        You will find a resource list of frequently asked questions and answers on the Ezra website.

·        If you haven’t done so already, I highly recommend you order "The United Methodist Church Financial Records Handbook 2017-2020” from Cokesbury.  It will be well worth the $13 investment.  If you follow their suggestions you’d be able to complete these reports with ease.

Rev. Hugh Hendrickson

Associate Pastor

Greensboro First UMC

hugh.hendrickson@ngumc.net

706-453-7064

4.  From The DS

Over the holidays, I read a couple of books – including J. D. Vance’s book, “Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis.”  Here is the gist of that book, encapsulated from one page.  After reading this, you can see how one person can make a difference in a young person’s life:

“Entire volumes are devoted to the phenomenon of “resilient children”— kids who prosper despite an unstable home because they have the social support of a loving adult. I know Mamaw was good for me not because some Harvard psychologist says so but because I felt it.

Consider my life before I moved in with Mamaw. In the middle of third grade, (my mom and I) left Middletown and my grandparents to live in Preble County with Bob; at the end of fourth grade, we left Preble County to live in a Middletown duplex on the 200 block of McKinley Street; at the end of fifth grade, we left the 200 block of McKinley Street to move to the 300 block of McKinley Street, and by that time Chip was a regular in our home, though he never lived with us; at the end of sixth grade, we remained on the 300 block of McKinley Street, but Chip had been replaced by Steve (and there were many discussions about moving in with Steve); at the end of seventh grade, Matt had taken Steve’s place, Mom was preparing to move in with Matt, and Mom hoped that I would join her in Dayton; at the end of eighth grade, she demanded that I move to Dayton, and after a brief detour at my dad’s house, I acquiesced; at the end of ninth grade, I moved in with Ken— a complete stranger— and his three kids. On top of all that were the drugs, the domestic violence case, children’s services prying into our lives, and Papaw dying. Today, even remembering that period long enough to write it down invokes an intense, indescribable anxiety in me. …... For seven long years, I just wanted it to stop. I didn’t care so much about the fighting, the screaming, or even the drugs. I just wanted a home, and I wanted to stay there…

Now consider the sum of my life after I moved in with Mamaw permanently. At the end of tenth grade, I lived with Mamaw, in her house, with no one else. At the end of eleventh grade, I lived with Mamaw, in her house, with no one else. At the end of twelfth grade, I lived with Mamaw, in her house, with no one else. I could say that the peace of Mamaw’s home gave me a safe space to do my homework. I could say that the absence of fighting and instability let me focus on school and my job. I could say that spending all of my time in the same house with the same person made it easier for me to form lasting friendships with people at school. I could say that having a job and learning a bit about the world helped clarify precisely what I wanted out of my own life. In hindsight, those explanations make sense, and I am certain that a bit of truth lies in each. I’m sure that a sociologist and a psychologist, sitting in a room together, could explain why I lost interest in drugs, why my grades improved, why I aced the SAT, and why I found a couple of teachers who inspired me to love learning. But what I remember most of all is that I was happy— I no longer feared the school bell at the end of the day, I knew where I’d be living the next month, and no one’s romantic decisions affected my life. And out of that happiness came so many of the opportunities I’ve had for the past twelve years.”     

 

 

Yours for the Kingdom,

Terry Fleming

Augusta District Superintendent

PO Box 204600
Augusta, GA  30907

Office:  706-651-8621

Fax:  706-651-8622

Cell:  678-447-6034

 

"Mockers can get a whole town agitated, but the wise will calm anger."  Prov. 29:8

 

 

 

 


 
 

 

District Superintendent


Terry Fleming
(706) 651-8621
terry.fleming@ngumc.net
View Bio

Administrative Assistant

Tina Lancaster
(706) 651-8621
agst@ngumc.net

Contact Information

Office Address:
3332 West Cliffe Court
Augusta, GA 30907

Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 204600
Augusta, GA 30917

(706) 651-8621 Phone
(706) 651-8622 Fax

agst@ngumc.net
http://www.ngumc.org/agst