Andone, Chewning and Everhart appointed to cabinet


      The three cabinet members announced recently by Bishop Mike Watson come from varied backgrounds and experience but express similar aspirations as they prepare for their new appointments.
    Herzen Andone, Richard Chewning and Dana Everhart all say they will emphasize the importance of strengthening the bond between clergy and laity in fulfilling the mission of the church.
    “Few things are as important as when we, as clergy and laity, are united and work in harmony,” Everhart said.
      “It is a beautiful thing when we can put aside any differences we have and work together,” Andone said. “It can be a powerful witness to the world when we are unified in service.”
   “I hope to be able to empower laity and clergy to have an impact at the (local) church level,” Chewning said. “We need to be free to do what God called us to do and have fun doing it.”
The new cabinet appointments are effective July 1.
     Andone, currently serving as senior pastor of Peachtree City UMC, will become the district superintendent of the Northwest District. Mike Cavin, current superintendent of the district, will move to Milledgeville First UMC as senior pastor. 
     Chewning, senior pastor of Greensboro First UMC, will become superintendent of the Gainesville District. Current superintendent Gerald Thurman has applied for incapacity leave due to the seven-year progression of Parkinson's disease.  
   Everhart, senior pastor of McDonough First UMC, will become superintendent of the Atlanta Emory District. Jim Cantrell, the current district superintendent, will become senior pastor of Snellville UMC.    
      “It is important for all of us to work together for the common good,” Everhart said. “Our churches need to be open and willing to engage in new ideas, embracing young people as well as old. We need to be open to the possibilities of what God is calling us to do.”
    Dana Everhart, a native of Brandon, Fla., holds a Bachelor of Arts in Christian Education from Florida Southern College and a Master of Divinity from the Candler School of Theology. He was ordained an elder in 1988 and has served appointments at Aldersgate UMC (Augusta), Elberton FUMC, Moreland UMC, Faith UMC (Cartersville), Bright Star UMC (Douglasville) and Zoar UMC.

    He is married to the former Sally McGill from South Carolina and they have three children, Matthew, Jacob, and Katie.
     Richard Chewning grew up in Tucker, Ga., and graduated from Mercer University in Atlanta with a degree in Marketing and Management. After graduation, he worked for 10 years in computer sales. He earned a Masters of Divinity degree from Candler School of Theology in 1992.  He was ordained an elder in 1995.
          He has previously served at Providence United Methodist in Lavonia, Hopewell United Methodist in Milledgeville, and has been the senior pastor at Greensboro for 14 years.       
     “I am passionate about the local church and the role it plays in people’s lives,” Chewning said. “We know in a world of uncertainty it is faith that sustains us.”
       Chewning is married to the former Susan Mobley of Winder.  They have two boys, Jonathan and Matthew.
        Herzen Andone was born in the Philippines and grew up in a U.S. Navy family. After a brief career in business, Herzen went on to earn a bachelor’s degree from the University of Florida and his master’s degree from Candler School of Theology. Andone was ordained in 1990 and has served on staff at Lithonia UMC, Canton UMC, and Duluth First UMC. For 11 years, he served as the senior pastor of Hickory Flat UMC in Canton and for the last three years as the senior pastor of Peachtree City UMC.
     “I think one of our most important missions is to have our eyes and ears on the laity and see how we can raise up leaders for the next generation,” Andone said. “It is the call of the church.”
    Andone has been married to Rev. Jennifer Andone for 22 years. Jennifer serves on the pastoral staff of Fayetteville First UMC. They have two sons, Dakin and Dylan.

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