Is a warehouse an appropriate place for a church?

10/10/2011

      Members of Mosaic UMC, a 2003 new church start in Evans, Georgia, in the Augusta District, decided that a warehouse was a suitable space for worship. The church purchased the warehouse where they were doing ministry and renting 8,500 square feet at 478 Columbia Industrial Boulevard, which gave them another 11,500 square feet of space, plus an additional 10,000 square feet if they build a second floor.
     Opening the first new section of the warehouse in March, Mosaic hosted a “Stop Hunger Now” event with 270 volunteers packaging 55,000 meals that were being sent to Zambia to feed children. Currently the new warehouse space is being used for a children’s weekday ministry and community groups.
     In more than seven years of weekly worship, Mosaic has seen 130 baptisms and 185 professions of faith. Average weekly attendance is 225 in a contemporary worship setting. Mosaic Downtown is a ministry targeting low- and no-income adults, especially at two subsidized apartment complexes. A food pantry is open twice monthly, along with worship and discipleship. Celebrate Recovery is a twelve-step ministry for people with addictions and other life-compromising issues (Mosaic offers the only porn recovery group in the area). Jerusalem House is a transitional home for families in crisis. Mosaic partners with Action Ministries, and announces the graduation this year of another family into an independent living situation.  Father’s Heart is a ministry birthed out of Mosaic that promotes mentoring for kids at risk. Through Angel Food Ministries, food was provided for low-income households. 
     This year, five mission teams were sent for short-term projects.  A total of 50 adults and students became the hands and feet of Christ in South Africa, Mississippi, inner-city Atlanta (through Safehouse Outreach), and inner-city Augusta (two teams deployed locally).    
      Mosaic was constituted as a United Methodist Church in November 2006. Carolyn Moore is the current and founding pastor.
 


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